1. Home
  2. Architecture

Bord-du-Lac House by Henri Cleinge

Four generations of a single family, from child to great grandparent, needed a home that reflected their ancestral history and their modern lifestyle.  The Bord-du-Lac House by Henri Cleinge features a contemporary addition that connects to a restored stone cottage that has stood for over 200 years.  Together, these structures create a multi-generational living space that provides private comfort and shared family spaces for each occupant.

The Bord-du-Lac House began with a renovation plan for the old stone cottage and continued with the modern addition.  The addition would house the client, a young couple, and the restored section would be home to a great grandparent, a pair of grandparents and their grandchild.  The cottage is largely private, while the modern wing features a kitchen, dining spaces, living rooms and sliding-glass doors that open to a large shared patio.

Such multi-generational living spaces are rare in the United States, but we could learn from our nearby neighbors in Quebec.  An emphasis on individual living has largely fractured family units into their own homes often very far apart.  With the state of the US housing and employment markets, old-world multi-generational living might be an increasingly common way of life.  Designs like the Bord-du-Lac House by Henri Cleinge make this an attractive option, one that could help drive a trend that may be ultimately necessary for some families in a changing domestic lifestyle in the United States.  [architect: henri cleinge photographer: marc cramer via: archdaily]

Bord du Lac House by Henri Cleinge 10 600x999 Bord du Lac House by Henri Cleinge

Bord du Lac House by Henri Cleinge 8 600x944 Bord du Lac House by Henri Cleinge

Bord-du-Lac House by Henri Cleinge 12

Bord-du-Lac House by Henri Cleinge 5

Bord-du-Lac House by Henri Cleinge | Gallery

Liked our story? Share it with friends

What do you think?