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Enneagram Type 2 (Giver and Helper) Motivations, Fears, and Levels of Development

The Enneagram Type 2 personality is one of the nine archetypes of the Enneagram of Personality. People with Enneagram Type 2 personalities are altruistic and value philanthropy. Enneagram Type 2 bears the nickname the Giver under the Enneagram because of their generous nature.

Enneagram Type 2: The Idealist and The Perfectionist

The Enneagram of Personality uses nine archetypes to describe a person’s unique personality based on their motivations, characteristics, strengths, and weaknesses. Philosopher George Gurdjieff popularized the geometrical Enneagram symbol and Oscar Ichazo used the symbol to teach his original Enneagram system at his Arica School in Chile. During Ichazo’s time teaching at Arica, he taught Chilean psychologist Claudio Naranjo, who wrote about the Enneagram in his book, Character and Neurosis.

The Enneagram of Personality categorizes each of the nine archetypes into three subcategories known as the centers of intelligence: the Head, the Heart, and the Body. The centers of intelligence describe how Enneagram types process and respond to stress. Enneagram Type 2 is a Heart Type and as such, they have a profound connection to grief. Givers respond to stress by using their shame and heartache as a basis for their good deeds. Enneagram Type 2s strive to quell their negative feelings with an outward projection of altruism. People with Enneagram Type 2 personalities develop themselves by focusing on their own emotional needs instead of masking their emotions while taking care of other people.

The main strengths of Enneagram Type 2 personalities are dependability, compassion, and thoughtfulness. Enneagram Type 2s care deeply for others and want to ensure people are taken care of. Givers work hard to remain reliable and show up for people in their time of need. The main weaknesses of Enneagram Type 2s are avoidant behavior, hiding their emotions, and insincerity. Type 2s want to appear stable and optimistic, but to maintain their appearance, they avoid stressors and hide their negative emotions. Additionally, Enneagram Type 2s tend to emphasize their generosity to the extent it comes across as insincere.

Enneagram Type 2 personalities’ main motivation in life is reciprocity in relationships. Givers put emotional energy into relationships in hopes they receive admiration. Type 2s struggle to balance their desire to be selfless and the fear of their selfless acts going unnoticed or appreciated.

People with Type 2 personalities experience healthy, average, and unhealthy emotional responses at nine levels. Healthy Givers experience levels 1-3, average Givers function between levels 4-6, and unhealthy Givers operate between levels 7-9. Healthy Enneagram Type 2s are humble about their generosity and feel confident in themselves. Average Enneagram Type 2s are empathetic and put themselves out there to help other people. Unhealthy Enneagram Type 2s suffer from low self-esteem and resentment towards others.

Enneagram Type 2s often work within the non-profit sector, politics, or education. Givers excel in careers that utilize their strengths of reliability and concern for others. Enneagram Type 2s are upbeat and enjoy working and socializing with a wide variety of people. Their desire to touch the lives of others far outweighs introverted tendencies. However, some Type 2s need to withdraw from social engagements to recharge after exerting too much emotional energy.

Givers have either an Enneagram Type 1 or Type 3 for a wing. Enneagram 2w1 personalities are more idealistic about their good deeds. However, the idealistic views of a 2w1 cause them to be more self-critical about their failures. Enneagram 2w3 personalities aspire to be successful. Enneagram 2w3s believe others value their achievements and often brag about their accomplishments or generosity. Their emphasis on success and their accomplishments make them appear arrogant.

What are the motivations of Enneagram Type 2?

Below are four core motivations of Enneagram Type 2 personalities.

  • Helping others: Enneagram Type 2 people’s main motivation is to help others. Working with other people, devoting time to good causes, and charity efforts all push Enneagram Type 2 to grow as a person.
  • Appreciation: Enneagram Type 2s go out of their way to help others because they want to feel appreciated and loved. They reach out to others in hopes of being seen as compassionate and obliging.
  • Feeling useful: Givers want to feel useful and as if they’re part of a team. Enneagram Type 2s don’t want to sit back and take credit for something they didn’t do. Instead, Givers are stimulated by participation.
  • Security: Enneatype 2s are motivated by security and cementing their place within a group. Type 2s put a lot of weight on reciprocity and will go out of their way to ensure their position among peers.

The motivations of Enneagram Type 2 people are different from other types in how they present their desires and fears. For example, Enneagram Type 2 and Type 7 are both lively and upbeat. However, Enneagram Type 2s emphasize compassion and a desire to help others as a way to portray their positivity, whereas Type 7s accentuate spontaneity and excitement.

What are the basic fears for Enneagram Type 2?

Below are the four main fears for Enneagram Type 2.

  • Being insignificant: Enneagram Type 2s fear insignificance. Type 2s need to feel as if they play an important role in a group or society. Givers combat their fear by putting themselves in positions of power to help others.
  • Appearing egotistical: Enneatype 2s fear appearing egotistical because they want other people to view them as generous. Givers enjoy expressing their generosity and want to appear happy to lend a hand to those in need.
  • Being unloved: Enneagram Type 2s fear being unloved or unappreciated. Givers often neglect self-care and as a result, they rely on the appreciation of others to sustain their self-esteem.
  • Addressing their problems: Enneagram Type 2s fear having to address their problems. Typically, Enneatype 2s avoid their issues in favor of taking control of other people’s problems. By doing so, Givers allow their troubles to build up until they risk breaking under the pressure.

The basic fears for Enneagram Type 2 are different from other types due to how adamant Givers are to appear helpful and how reliant they are on the opinions of others. For example, Enneagram Type 2 and Enneagram Type 5 both fear facing their personal needs. However, Enneagram Type 5 will withdraw from interacting with others as a way to cope with their fear, while Enneagram Type 2 chooses to surround themselves with other people.

How does Enneagram figure explain Enneagram Type 2?

The Enneagram figure is a nine-pointed geometric shape that models the human psyche and helps to explain the nine different personality types. Each Enneagram personality type forms wings, growth lines, and stress lines with other Enneatypes. Enneagram Type 2 neighbors Enneagram Type 1 and Type 3, a growth line leading to Type 4, and a stress line leading to Type 8. The wings of Type 2 help to explain the depth of each type, while growth and stress lines explain how a type responds to positive and stressful stimuli.

Below is a table explaining the Enneagram type 2 figure, including its motivation, fear, characteristic role, trap, and ego fixation (the basic criteria used to characterize Enneatype personalities).

EnneatypeMotivationFearCharacteristic RoleTrapEgo Fixation
Enneagram Type 2Being helpfulBeing unlovedBeing a helpfulJusticeFlattery

What is the Characteristic Role of Enneagram Type 2?

The Enneagram Type 2 is called the Giver because they give up their time and energy to take care of other people. Enneagram Type 2 bears the additional nicknames of the Helper and the Caregiver. The main characteristics of Enneagram Type 2 describe a person willing to give until the point of neglecting their personal needs. Unlike other charitable Enneagram Types, such as Enneatype 9, Enneagram Type 2 struggles to take care of themselves before taking care of others.

What is the Ego Fixation of Enneagram Type 2?

The Ego Fixation of Enneagram Type 2 is flattery or receiving praise. Ego Fixations are a concept within the Enneagram first theorized by Oscar Ichazo that explain the intellectual preoccupations of each type. Individuals needs to recognize their Ego Fixation if they hope to grow beyond the limitations of that specific Enneatype. For example, if an Enneagram Type 2 wants to achieve growth they need to recognize their core motivation is to receive praise from others, not to help them. Givers are desperate to feel they play a significant role in society and flattery helps solidify their confidence. However, to achieve growth, they have to recognize their self-worth.

What is the Trap for Enneagram Type 2?

The Trap for Enneagram Type 2 is achieving freedom by believing appreciation and flattery will lift them out of Ego Fixation. The Ego Trap is the most logical solution to escape Ego Fixation for Enneagram Type 2. However, a Trap will keep Type 2 stuck in their mental fixation. For example, Enneagram Type 2s give their time and energy to other people in hopes that those people will reciprocate their actions and take care of their problems. However, this isn’t a guarantee and leaves the Enneagram Type 2 unable to grow.

What is the Temptation of Enneagram Type 2?

The Temptation of Enneagram Type 2 is pride. Enneagram Type 2s believe they are better able to help others than they can help themselves. Givers insert themselves into other people’s lives as if they’re doing them a favor, whether their help is welcome or not. Enneagram Type 2s are at risk of sacrificing their own needs in preference for their temptation of pride. However, pride only helps to fuel their Ego Fixation and reinforce the Trap.

What is the Virtue of Enneagram Type 2?

The Virtue of Enneagram Type 2 is humility. Enneagram Type 2s are tempted to continue pursuing flattery because they lack the humility necessary to pursue true growth. Givers are proud of appearing stoic and low maintenance. However, having a false sense of stability and faking a carefree attitude cause Givers to carry emotional baggage that begins to weigh them down. Enneagram Type 2s need to let go of their pride and develop humility.

What is the Holy Idea of Enneagram Type 2?

The Holy Idea of Enneagram Type 2 is the holy freedom of serving their own needs and desires. Enneagram Type 2s try to ignore their true route to freedom by focusing on others. The Holy Idea of an Enneagram Type is the way to escape Ego Fixation. For example, Enneagram Type 2 provides for others to receive praise. Due to their Ego Fixation on flattery, Givers’ core motivations are selfish, and they only seek to help others as a form of self-service. Enneagram Type 2s can remedy their egotism and experience true freedom by learning what they need and satisfying their true desires.

How does Enneagram Type 2 integrate with others?

The Enneagram Type 2 integrates with others by embodying Enneagram Type 4, experiencing growth, and becoming more self-aware. Enneagram Type 2s grow by focusing on their personal needs and desires. The more an Enneagram Type 2 experiences introspection and growth, the closer Type 2s become to reflecting the emotional responses of Enneagram Type 4. For example, people with the Enneagram Type 2 personality focus on other people’s lives and problems while ignoring their own. Type 2 people are prone to acting authoritatively toward others based on their belief that their generosity and assistance are superior. An Enneagram Type 2 should practice introspection to develop a clearer view of the depth of the human condition and become more cognizant of their true identity. Givers channel the creativity and freedom of the Enneagram Type 4 because of their self-actualization and growth.

How does Enneagram Type 2 disintegrate with others?

Enneagram Type 2 disintegrates with others by manifesting traits of Enneagram Type 8 during times of stress by continuing to ignore their personal needs. Enneagram Type 2s experience stress if they feel their efforts to uplift and give back to others fall through. However, their solution to the pressure is to assert themselves in other people’s lives further. Type 2’s arrogance is off-putting in juxtaposition to their typical optimistic generosity, and they begin to bear resemblance to Enneagram Type 8. Additionally, Enneagram Type 2s develop resentment toward people in their lives if they feel there wasn’t an equal exchange of emotional labor.

What are the scientists’ opinions of Enneagram Type 2?

Two researchers who have published their opinions on Enneagram Type 2 are Dr. David N. Daniels and Dr. Beatrice. Firstly, Dr. David N. Daniels was a professor of Clinical and Behavioral Sciences at Stanford University School of Medicine.

Dr. Daniels is one of the principal Enneagram teachers. Daniels stated the main strength of Type 2s is their helpful nature, and their main weakness is their pride. In Dr. Daniels’ book, The Essential Enneagram, he describes the Enneagram Type 2 as people that focus on helping others and fear falling short of their expectations. Secondly, Dr. Beatrice Chestnut is a psychotherapist and Enneagram expert. In Dr. Chestnut’s book, The Complete Enneagram, she describes the Enneagram Type 2 as a person that wants to win approval and feels wanted through the act of giving or providing emotional support. Chestnut states the main strength of Enneagram Type 2s is their supportive nature, and their main weakness is their ability to manipulate others by emphasizing how helpful they are.

What are the wings of Enneagram Type 2?

The wings of Enneagram Type 2 are the two adjacent Enneatypes, Type 1 and Type 3. Enneagram wings help explain the more nuanced qualities of each personality type. Below are the wings of Enneagram Type 2.

  • Enneagram 2w1: Enneagram 2w1 is more introverted and interested in helping individuals.
  • Enneagram 2w3: Enneagram 2w3 is more extroverted and has a greater interest in bringing people together.

1. Enneagram 2w1

The Enneagram 2w1 is one of the two Enneagram wings for Type 2 and results from a Type 2 resembling the characteristics of the left wing, Type 1. Enneagram Type 1 is called the Perfectionist and desires to live a moral and sensible life. Type 2w1 is different from other types because they combine the self-righteousness of Type 1 and the altruism of Type 2. The self-preservation instincts of 2w1 reveal a likable person who tries to take the moral high road. One-to-one or sexual instincts of 2w1 show a person who will use charm and virtue to signal to others that they are morally superior. The social instincts of 2w1 reveal a person who overworks themselves to appear perfect.

2. Enneagram 2w3

The Enneagram 2w3 is the second of two Enneagram wings for Type 2 and is the outcome of Type 2 integrating with the characteristics of the right wing, Type 3. Enneagram Type 3 is called the Achiever because of its need to be successful. Type 2w3 is different from other types because they’re strong communicators and highly ambitious. The self-preservation instincts of 2w3 show a person who is idealistic and wants to do good in the world. One-to-one or sexual instincts reveal a person inspired by charm and pride. Social instincts show a person who is competitive about their ambition.

What are the developmental levels of Enneagram Type 2?

Nine developmental levels of Enneagram Type 2 explain the attachment a person has to their type’s identity. Developmental levels divide into three categories of Healthy, Average, and Unhealthy, and they illustrate how an Enneatype’s main traits either hold them back or propel them forward in growth. The nine developmental levels were first theorized by Don Richard Riso and are integral to understanding personal growth through the lens of the Enneagram. Below is a breakdown of each category of Healthy, Average, and Unhealthy Enneagram Type 2s and how each level manifests.

  • Healthy Enneagram Type 2: Levels 1, 2, and 3 showcase the high-functioning traits of an Enneagram Type 2.
  • Average Enneagram Type 2: Levels 4, 5, and 6 describe a standard Enneatype 2 personality.
  • Unhealthy Enneagram Type 3: Levels 7, 8, and 9 highlight the maladjusted Enneagram Type 2.

How is a healthy Enneagram Type 2?

Healthy Enneagram Type 2s are compassionate, empathetic, and altruistic without having ulterior motives. Enneagram Type 2s pride themselves in their generosity, but their intentions aren’t pure. Givers believe in reciprocity because they want to receive admiration for their efforts. Healthy Enneagram Type 2s exhibit the positive traits of an Enneagram type 2 without harboring the belief that they deserve recognition and praise.

1. Enneagram Type 2 Level 1 analysis

Enneagram Type 2 level 1 is the ideal representation of Enneagram Type 2. Givers at level 1 offer unconditional love and support to others. Level 1 is healthy for Enneagram Type 2s because they’re able to act without motive and take the time to focus on personal problems without fear of judgment. Healthy Enneagram Type 2s at level 1 change from needing reassurance from others to having self-confidence.

2. Enneagram Type 2 Level 2 analysis

Enneagram Type 2 level 2 allows Givers to confront their fears of being unloved. Givers at level 2 are aware of their empathy and need to feel loved. Level 2 is healthy for Enneagram Type 2s because they can only start to work through their weaknesses if they acknowledge having weaknesses to begin with. Healthy Enneagram Type 2s at level 2 showcase the change from ignoring their weaknesses and fear to conquering them.

3. Enneagram Type 2 Level 3 analysis

Enneagram Type 2 level 3 is the first step in becoming a Healthy representation of Enneagram type 2. Givers at level 3 are supportive, generous, and able to see that people have good intentions. Level 3 is healthy for an Enneagram Type 2 because it acts as a stepping stone to understanding the Giver’s true self. Healthy Enneagram type 2s at level 3 change from relying on their role in a friend group to determining their self-worth to become secure in their identity.

How does Enneagram Type Two react to stress?

Enneagram Type 2s react to stress differently depending on if they’re Healthy or Unhealthy Type 2s. Healthy Enneagram Type 2s nurture their needs and desires, allowing them to feel more in control during times of stress. Unhealthy Enneatype 2s are unable to let go of their pride to focus on personal needs. Ultimately, Type 2s negligent behavior drives them to resentment and manipulative behavior reminiscent of Type 8.

How is an unhealthy Enneagram Type 2?

Unhealthy Enneagram Type 2s are manipulative, arrogant, and pushy. Enneagram Type 2s are vocal activists that insert themselves into people’s lives to offer help. However, Unhealthy Enneagram Type 2s try to force help upon people because they believe their empathy qualifies them to assist. Additionally, Unhealthy Enneagram Type 2s become manipulative and use their kind actions as leverage to coerce others to placate their needs.

1. Enneagram Type 2 Level 7 analysis

Enneagram Type 2 level 7 results in Givers ignoring their self-image as a supportive person and allowing their manipulative tendencies to show. Givers at level 7 are selfish but refuse to confront their selfish behavior instead they allow passive-aggressive behavior to reign. Level 7 is unhealthy for Enneagram Type 2s because it encourages them to be egocentric and revel in their pride. Unhealthy Enneagram Type 2s change at level 7 due to their arrogance taking over the selfless traits Type 2s typically want to exhibit.

2. Enneagram Type 2 Level 8 analysis

Enneagram Type 2 level 8 showcases Givers in a forceful and entitled light. Givers at level 8 believe they are owed for their good deeds and kindness and become overly authoritative. Level 8 is unhealthy for Enneagram Type 2 because it fosters a sense of privilege and selfishness. Unhealthy Enneagram Type 2s change at level 8 by becoming more self-centered and less concerned with others.

3. Enneagram Type 2 Level 9 analysis

Enneagram Type 2 level 9 is the base level of development for Givers. Givers at level 9 are at their most volatile and attempt to justify their selfish behavior by claiming to be ignored and unappreciated. Level 9 is unhealthy for Enneagram Type 2 because it reveals them at their most melodramatic and egotistical. Unhealthy Enneagram Type 2s must look to change by understanding their driving motivations and accepting that they aren’t always a victim.

What are the average Enneagram Type 2 levels?

Average Enneagram Type 2s want to please others, but they can become needy and bothersome. Enneagram Type 2s find it difficult to say no and struggle to find a balance between their emotional needs and the needs of others. Average Enneagram Type 2s are sensitive but manage to portray positivity to avoid falling into Unhealthy characteristics.

1. Enneagram Type 2 Level 4 analysis

Enneagram Type 2 level 4 gives themselves over to their temptation of pride. Givers at level 4 try to ignore their needs because they want to appear strong and stable. Level 4 represents an average Enneagram Type 2 because it showcases them as someone who wants to serve an important role in the lives of other people. Average Enneagram Type 2s change due to their desire to prove their worth, while other levels fuel the Giver’s manipulative qualities.

2. Enneagram Type 2 Level 5 analysis

Enneagram Type 2 level 5 is the developmental level that reveals the main weakness of Enneatype 2. Givers at level 5 are needy and possessive and believe they deserve more recognition than they’re receiving. Level 5 shows an average Enneagram Type 2 who expects reciprocity but doesn’t feel they need to explain themselves. Average Enneagram Type 2s use level 5 as a stepping stone to understanding their self-importance.

3. Enneagram Type 2 Level 6 analysis

Enneagram Type 2 level 6 is the first developmental level showcasing the average traits of Enneatype 2. Givers at level 6 are desperate for others to acknowledge their altruism. Level 6 shows an average Enneagram Type 2 who feels deserving of love and wants to avoid feeling unappreciated. Average Enneagram Type 2s change at level 6 by becoming more insecure and disingenuous.

How to recognize Enneagram Type 2?

Below are five ways to recognize an Enneagram Type 2 person.

  • Research the similarities and differences of each type: Human emotion is a spectrum and no emotion belongs solely to one set type. Therefore, it’s necessary to know the qualities of each Enneagram type before identifying that type in someone or yourself. For example, Enneagram Type 2s are lively and put others first, but the same description can apply to an Enneagram Type 7 if the deeper nuances aren’t taken into consideration.
  • Determine a person’s core motivation: The second step to recognizing an Enneagram Type 2 is to determine the subject’s core motivation. For example, an Enneagram Type 2 person wants to feel important and helpful to avoid confronting their shortcomings and insecurities.
  • Understand Enneatype 2’s levels of development: The third step to recognizing an Enneagram Type 2 is to understand the levels of development. Enneagram Type 2’s levels of development paint a clearer picture of the Enneagram Type 2 and better explain the characteristics of Type 2 as they grow.
  • Examine the presence of Type 2 wings: Taking Type 2 wings and how they affect a Type 2’s personality is the fourth step in recognizing Enneatype 2. Misidentification of Enneagram Type 2s can occur if a person exhibits and adheres to the traits of their neighboring types.
  • Analyze a person’s response to stress: The final step in recognizing Enneagram Type 2 is analyzing a person’s response to stress. Enneagram Type 2 people respond to times of extreme stress by becoming domineering, manipulative, and letting their pride take control. While other Enneagram types display controlling and manipulative traits, Givers exhibit these traits if they’re under stress.

Two key traits help in recognizing Enneagram Type 2. Firstly, Enneagram Type 2s believe in reciprocity. For example, if an Enneagram Type 2 always shows up to help a friend, they expect that friend to help them. Secondly, Enneagram type 2s are passive-aggressive. Enneagram Type 2s believe in reciprocity but are too proud to ask for help. As a result, Enneatype 2s resort to passive-aggressive behavior because they feel they’re owed for being so generous.

How rare is an Enneagram Type 2?

Enneagram Type 2 is a rare Enneatype. According to Enneagram population distribution research, Type 2 accounts for 8.5% of the population surveyed. Moreover, female Enneagram Type 2s account for 10%, while male Enneagram type 2s account for 6%.

Who are the famous Enneagram Type 2 people?

Below are five examples of famous Enneagram Type 2 people.

  • Terry Crews: Terry Crews is a former NFL football player turned actor, activist, and celebrity Enneagram Type 2 personality. Crews demonstrate the giving spirit of Enneatype 2 by taking a stand against sexism and working to fight against human trafficking.
  • Dolly Parton: Dolly Parton is a country music superstar and famous Enneagram Type 2. While Dolly Parton is one of the most notable names in music, she is equally as famous for her philanthropic endeavors. For example, Parton exhibits the Enneatype 2 traits by donating to medical research, creating the Imagination Library book gifting system, and funding scholarship programs.
  • Maya Angelou: Maya Angelou is a famous poet, activist, and celebrity. Enneagram Type 2. Angelou became a notable figure during the civil rights movement and rose to fame after the publication of her autobiography, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings. She demonstrates the Giver’s goodwill and humanitarian nature.
  • Jill Biden: Dr. Jill Biden is a lifelong educator, wife of President Joe Biden, and a famous Enneagram Type 2 personality. Dr. Biden reflects the positive energy and altruism of the Enneatype 2 by advocating for community colleges, military families, and breast cancer awareness.
  • Jon Bon Jovi: Jon Bon Jovi is a famous musician, political activist, altruist, and Enneagram Type 2. Bon Jovi showcases the character traits of Enneagram Type 2s with The Jon Bon Jovi Soul Foundation to help end poverty and homelessness.

What are the best occupations for Enneagram Type 2 people?

Below are four examples of ideal careers for Enneagram Type 2 People.

  • Social work: Social work allows Enneagram Type 2 to perform outreach and assert their expertise and knowledge to help others.
  • Counseling: Enneagram Type 2 personality types enjoy giving advice and offering help. Counseling allows Enneatype 2 to offer advice and assistance to other people.
  • Teaching: Teaching is a career best suited for Enneagram Type 2 people. Enneatype 2s are optimistic, generous, and want to give back to others. Teaching allows Enneatype 2s to touch the lives of many people and play a vital role in their community.
  • Registered nurse: Givers excel as Registered nurses because they can advocate for others, assist with medical procedures, and administer patient care. Enneagram Type 2s want to feel valued for their generosity, and nurses are valued members of society.

What are the hobbies of an Enneagram Type 2?

Below are four hobbies of an Enneagram Type 2.

  • Volunteering: Enneagram Type 2s enjoy volunteering in their free time. For example, an Enneatype 2 might spend their weekend walking dogs at the local shelter.
  • Community gardening: Community gardening combines the Enneagram Type 2s love of community outreach with a relaxing outdoor activity. Enneagram Type 2s want to see the fruits of their labor and working within a neighborhood garden gives them the satisfaction of recognition and giving back to others.
  • Reading: Enneatype 2s have a voracious thirst for knowledge. Reading allows the Giver to absorb new information and relax from their various social engagements and agendas.
  • Crafting: Givers enjoy crafting because it allows them to exhibit their emotions. Enneagram Type 2s often use their crafts as gifts for other people, which allows them to add a personal touch to their gift-giving.

What are the growth tips for Enneagram Type 2?

Below are five growth tips for Enneagram Type 2.

  • Commit to self-love: Givers often devote significant time and energy to other people and initiatives they value. However, by focusing on others, Enneatype 2s forgets to practice self-love.
  • Experiment with new interests: Enneatype 2s grow by experimenting with new hobbies and interests. A crucial step in growing as a person is unlocking new knowledge about yourself without trying new activities. Enneagram Type 2s won’t know everything they might enjoy without stepping out of their comfort zone.
  • Avoid criticism and negativity: Enneagram Type 2 personalities are at risk of becoming hypercritical because they believe their opinions and advice are superior. Type 2s grow by remaining positive in tumultuous times.
  • Develop healthy boundaries: Before Givers achieve positive growth, they need to develop healthy boundaries. Enneatype 2s are prone to both asserting themselves into people’s lives and having difficulty telling people no. Givers need to become comfortable as autonomous people to grow into a healthier version of their type.
  • Remember not everybody needs assistance: Enneagram Type 2s needs to step up to help people if they sense assistance is needed. However, for an Enneagram Type 2 to grow, they must accept that not all assistance is wanted and people are capable of taking care of themselves.

How do Enneagram Type 2 people motivate themselves?

Enneagram Type 2 people motivate themselves by focusing on attending to the needs of others. Givers need to feel useful and secure amongst their peers is the driving force behind their characteristic generosity. As a result, Enneagram Type 2s appear altruistic while harboring the hidden agenda of coercing others to like them.

What are the strengths of Enneagram Type 2 for Business?

Below are four main strengths of Enneagram Type 2 for business.

  • Positive attitude: Enneagram Type 2s maintain a positive attitude in the workplace. A positive attitude is a valuable asset for client relations and teamwork.
  • Flexible: Enneagram Type 2s want to please people and are happy to make necessary adjustments at work. For example, an Enneagram Type 2 might be working on a project at work but are willing to switch to a new task if a coworker requests for them too.
  • Compassionate: Enneagram Type 2s are supportive of their coworkers and make compassionate business partners.
  • Social team players: Enneagram Type 2s are social and work well on a team. Givers want to feel important to the business and will work diligently to satisfy the needs of their team.

What are the struggles for Enneagram Type Two?

Below are four main struggles for Enneagram Type 2.

  • Humility: Enneagram Type 2s struggle with humility because of their intense pride. Givers find it difficult to admit they’re wrong and choose to ignore their needs.
  • Self-love: Enneagram type 2s struggle with self-love and respect because they view it as a weakness. Givers work diligently to help others and expect them to return the favor. However, Enneagram Type 2s inevitably neglect to love themselves as a result.
  • Saying no: Enneagram type 2s struggle to tell other people no and as a result, Type 2s emotionally exhaust themselves. Givers say yes to the point they have little to no energy left for their problems.
  • Passive-aggressive tendencies: Enneagram Type 2s struggle with passive-aggressive tendencies because they avoid speaking up for themselves. Although believing they deserve recognition for their good deeds, Givers ignore their feelings and slowly resort to passive-aggressive behavior.

How does Enneagram Type 2 socialize?

Enneagram Type 2 socializes by offering to assist and encourage others to live happy lives. Givers are highly social with an inviting disposition that makes other people feel comfortable and safe. Enneagram Type 2s are generous and assert their presence among friends and family. Type 2s are supportive lovers and socialize with their partners by doting on them. Givers work well with others and can network with ease in a business setting. While the Enneagram Type 2 maintains multiple positive social tendencies, Type 2 struggles to maintain its positive attitude at times. For example, Enneagram Type 2s are sensitive and become angry if others ignore their kindness.

How is an Enneagram Type 2 in a family?

Enneagram Type 2 are loving and supportive family members. Children of Enneagram Type 2 parents will have two warm, generous, and self-sacrificing parents. However, Enneagram Type 2 parents risk pampering their children and treating them more as a pet than a person. Enneagram type 2s work hard to offer protection and security to their siblings but resent them if they don’t return the sentiment. Overall, Enneagram Type 2s are reliable members of the family that work hard to secure their role in the familial unit.

How is an Enneagram Type 2 in a relationship?

Relationships with an Enneagram Type 2 can be inviting but volatile. Givers are warm, welcoming, and generous with their time and energy. They are happy solidifying their position within a relationship and serving an important role in someone they love in life. Enneagram Type 2s are emotional and able to sense the emotions of their partner, allowing them to uniquely support their partner. However, Enneagram Type 2s allow their sensitivities get the better of them and use their good deeds to manipulate their partner with insincere acts.

How is an Enneagram Type 2 in friendship?

Enneagram Type 2 people are reliable friends who are always eager to be included in activities. Givers are social and want to maintain an important role within their friend group. Enneagram Type 2s go out of their way to help their friends, but Givers have an ulterior motive for their generosity. While Type 2s are happy to play a vital role in their friend group, they expect their friends to acknowledge their important role in the group. Despite Type 2 defaulting to insincere acts of kindness, they make loyal friends if proper boundaries are set.

How does the Enneagram Type 2 male differ from the Type 2 female?

The Enneagram Type 2 male differs from the Type 2 female in how they showcase their characteristic qualities. Enneagram type 2s display traits that society associates with female energy, such as acting as a caregiver, possessing empathy, and having an inviting presence. Male Enneagram Type 2 people are caring and empathetic but society’s idea of masculinity interferes with how they present themselves to the public. According to Enneagram population distribution statistics, 10% of women test as an Enneagram Type 2 while 6% of men align with the Type 2 personality.

How do Enneagram Type 2 people control themselves?

Enneagram Type 2 people control themselves through their intense desire to appear stable. Givers struggle to maintain the appearance of self-control and employ the defense mechanism of repression to do so. They quell their volatile emotions and negative inner voice by focusing on controlling other people’s lives and situations. Enneagram Type 2s are in jeopardy of their defense mechanism failing and need to learn how to control their emotions by facing them head-on. If Enneagram Type 2 doesn’t examine their false sense of self-control, they won’t grow into a healthier version of Enneatype 2.

How is a relationship with Enneagram Type 2?

The sort of relationship an Enneagram Type 2 has with other Enneatypes depends on the presence of harmony and conflict within the relationship. Each Enneagram Type has different core motivations and desires, which can interfere with cultivating a good relationship.

Below are descriptions of how a relationship with Enneagram Type 2 is depending on the chosen Enneatype.

  • Enneagram Type 2 and 1 relationship: Types 2 and 1 are a good pairing for a harmonious relationship because they complement each other’s reliability.
  • Enneagram Type 2 and 3 relationship: Types 2 and 3 are a harmonious combination that wants to feel important and loved.
  • Enneagram Type 2 and 4 relationship: Types 2 and 4 make for a healthy partnership because Type 4s encourage Type 2s to express themselves.
  • Enneagram Type 2 and 5 relationship: Types 2 and 5 can experience conflict in relationships due to Givers not respecting Type 5s autonomy.
  • Enneagram Type 2 and 6 relationship: Types 2 and 6 are a good combination for a harmonious relationship because they both value hard work and respect.
  • Enneagram Type 2 and 7 relationship: Types 2 and 7 can experience conflict in a relationship because Type 2s need more attention than 7s can give.
  • Enneagram Type 2 and 8 relationship: Types 2 and 8 make an unsuitable couple because they have different core motivations.
  • Enneagram Type 2 and 9 relationship: Types 2 and 9 are harmonious pairings that make a good couple because of their many similarities and positive attitudes.

1. Enneagram Type 2 and Type 1 relationship

A relationship between Enneagram Type 2 and Type 1 is a promising pairing that remains loyal to each other. The main strength of an Enneagram Type 2 and Type 1 relationship is their determination to provide a stable environment for their partners. Despite their supportive qualities, Enneagram Type 2 and Type 1 will struggle with how they express their emotions. The biggest potential issue with a Type 2 and Type 1 relationship is a lack of communication because both types work to ignore their problems.

2. Enneagram Type 2 and Type 3 relationship

Enneagram Type 2 and Type 3 relationships combine the lively spirit of Type 2 and the ambition of Type 3 to cultivate a partnership based on mutual love and support. The main strength of an Enneagram Type 2 and Type 3 relationship is their optimism and outgoing nature. Type 2s and Type 3s are a couple that maintain strong friendships with other couples and go on group dates. Enneagram Type 2s and Type 3s struggle with giving and accepting attention. The biggest potential issue for Type 2s and 3s is that Type 2s are needier than their Type 3 partner.

3. Enneagram Type 2 and Type 4 relationship

Enneagram Type 2 and Type 4 people have successful and healthy relationships with each other. The main strength of a relationship between Type 2 and Type 4 is the combination of creativity and optimism. Type 4 has a strong creative spirit and confidence that inspire the Giver to embrace their individualism and creativity. Enneagram Type 2 and Type 4 couples struggle with controlling their subconscious emotions. The biggest potential issue is that both types are needy and fail to set proper boundaries.

4. Enneagram Type 2 and Type 5 relationship

A relationship between Enneagram Type 2 and Type 5 is an uncommon pairing that has the potential for being a successful partnership. The main strength of a relationship between Type 2 and Type 5 is how different they are from one another. Enneatypes 2 and 5 use their differences to fit together like a puzzle piece. For example, Giver’s warmth will bring out a softer side to Type 5. Enneagram Type 2 and Type 5 struggle with disrespecting each other’s individuality. The biggest potential issue between the two types is Type 2s possessive nature because Type 5 requires autonomy.

5. Enneagram Type 2 and Type 6 relationship

A relationship between Enneagram Type 2 and Type 6 is loving, secure, and built on mutual respect. Enneagram Type 2 and Type 6’s relationship showcases strength through their devotion to their partner. However, Enneagram Type 2 and Type 6 experience relationship struggles because of their different ideas of offering help. The biggest potential issue is how Type 2 becomes pushy, while Type 6 needs more freedom than 2s are used to.

6. Enneagram Type 2 and Type 7 relationship

Enneagram Type 2 and Type 7 relationships are exciting, but conflict arises because of Type 7s impulsivity. Type 2 Helpers and Type 7 Enthusiasts share the strength of being well-liked and social. Givers initially see the 7’s energy as exciting, and Enneagram Type 7 views 2s as passionate. However, a relationship between Type 2 and Type 7 struggles to remain healthy due to the same spontaneity that attracts Type 2. The biggest potential issue for Type 2 and 7 relationships is Type 2 requires reassurance to an extent that Type 7 can’t satisfy.

7. Enneagram Type 2 and Type 8 relationship

The relationship between Enneagram Type 2 and Type 8 is a contentious pairing because each type has different desires and fears. The main strength of a potential relationship between Type 2 and Type 8 is their passion and drive. However, Types 2 and 8 in a relationship struggle with self-expression. The biggest potential issue is in Type 2’s refusal to express themselves and Type 8’s assertive manner of expressing themselves.

8. Enneagram Type 2 and Type 9 relationship

Enneagram Type 2 and Type 9 make for a happy relationship because of their generosity and concern for others. The main strength of the relationship between Enneagram Type 2 and Type 9 is their desire to maintain peace and harmony while together. Enneagram Type 9 is patient and kind with others, while Enneagram Type 2 is considerate of others’ needs. Type 2 and 9 will struggle with determining who will take the lead in the relationship. The biggest potential issue is how both can become passive-aggressive before speaking up about their needs.

What are the misidentifications for Enneagram Type 2?

Misidentification of the Enneagram Type 2 personality occurs if a person fails to recognize someone’s true motivations, strengths, and weaknesses. The misidentification of Enneagram Types prevents you as a person from achieving successful growth and conquering unhealthy traits. There are three main Enneagram Type 2 misidentifications. Firstly, Enneagram Type 2s are often mistaken for Type 6s. Enneatypes 2 and 6 both seek the approval of others and have kind dispositions. Secondly, Enneagram Type 2s are often confused with Type 8s. Enneatypes 2 and 8 both become domineering and value hard work. Finally, Enneagram Type 2s are often mistaken for Type 9s. Enneatypes 2 and 9 are both optimistic and enjoy working with other people.

Below is a breakdown of how a misidentification of Enneagram Type 2 occurs with each Enneatype.

1. Enneagram Type 2 and Type 1 misidentification

Misidentification of Enneagram Type 2 and Type 1 occurs because they are both one of each other’s respective wings. Type 2’s drive to please other people is often mistaken for Type 1’s ambition and perfectionism. Enneatype 1’s service-oriented spirit is often confused with Type 2’s altruism. Enneagram Type 2 and Type 1 are differentiated by their expression of emotions. Enneagram Type 2s ignores their emotions while Type 1s are more inclined to tell others how they feel.

2. Enneagram Type 2 and Type 3 misidentification

Misidentification of Enneagram Type 2 and Type 3 happens because both types want to be likable and appreciated. Enneagram Type 3 is one of the two types Enneagram Type 2 has as a wing, and as such, both Enneatypes share common characteristics. For example, Enneagram Type 3 desires to be the center of attention and feel like a valuable member of society, similar to Type 2.Enneatype 2 and Type 3 are differentiated by their core motivations. Type 2 personalities are motivated by their desire to appear selfless, whereas Type 3s are motivated by a desire to feel valuable.

3. Enneagram Type 2 and Type 4 misidentification

Enneagram Type 2 and Type 4 misidentification can occur because both have a strong connection with shame. Both Enneagram Type 2 and Type 4 are Heart types and are sensitive to their sense of shame and sadness. The main difference between Types 2 and 4 is the Giver’s core motivation of achieving approval by giving to others, even if that means sacrificing their identity. Type 4 is different from Type 2 because their core motivation is to be their true selves.

4. Enneagram Type 2 and Type 5 misidentification

Enneagram Type 2 and Type 5 misidentification is uncommon but can occur if Type 5s become too dependent on their loved ones. Helper Type 2s are reliant on the acceptance and appreciation of others, which is the driving force behind their good deeds. While it is typical for Type 5s to maintain a secure sense of self, if they let their guard down, they become codependent. The biggest difference between Enneagram Type 2 and 5 is in how each type socializes. Enneagram Type 2 is more outgoing and enjoys social activities, whereas Type 5 is more reserved.

5. Enneagram Type 2 and Type 6 misidentification

Misidentification of Type 2 and Type 6 is frequent because both types are friendly and rely on others for comfort. Enneagram Type 6s look to other people to encourage them and make them feel safe, similar to how Enneagram Type 6 requires reassurance from others. Additionally, both Type 2 and Type 6 possess warm personalities and enjoy playing important roles in friend groups. Despite the similarities between Types 2 and 6, the biggest difference lies in their core motivation. Enneagram Type 2s are motivated by their desire to be loved, while Type 6 is motivated by a desire to feel secure.

6. Enneagram Type 2 and Type 7 misidentification

Enneagram Type 2 and Type 7 misidentification stems from both types having lively personalities in social settings and always working with or assisting other people. Enthusiast Type 7s are busy people that use their projects, friend groups, and spontaneity to distract themselves from their fear. Type 2s take a similar approach to Type 7s in how they distract from their fear by happily helping others. However, the biggest difference between Type 2 and Type 7 is the root of their fear. Enneagram Type 2s fear being unappreciated and believe they will receive appreciation if they give to others. Enneagram Type 7s fear monotony and surround themselves with others to keep their lives exciting.

7. Enneagram Type 2 and Type 8 misidentification

Misidentification of Type 2 and Type 8 happens because Type 2 displays characteristics of Type 8 under stress. Enneagram Type 8s fear feeling inadequate or worthless, which inspires them to assert control over situations. Givers struggle with the belief that their ideas and methods are superior, resulting in Type 2s appearing controlling. The biggest difference between Type 2 and Type 8 is how they express their emotions. Enneagram Type 2s becomes passive-aggressive if they feel their good deeds aren’t appreciated. However, Type 8s have little difficulty expressing themselves and are openly aggressive about what they want.

8. Enneagram Type 2 and Type 9 misidentification

Misidentification of Enneagram Type 2 and Type 9 is a common occurrence because both types are optimistic, enjoy socializing, and desire a harmonious existence. Enneagram Type 9s are happy to help other people and are well-liked among their peers. Healthy Enneagram Type 2s resemble the altruistic and upbeat nature of Enneatype 9. However, the biggest difference between Enneagram Type 2 and Type 9 is their confidence. Givers struggle to recognize their problems or acknowledge their feelings, whereas Type 9s are self-assured and comfortable with their feelings.